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Learning through sponge painting

Learning through sponge painting

Learning through sponge painting

Sponge painting is a versatile art activity for kids of any ages. Both my gems enjoyed themselves so much, the pictures will tell it all. And it is really cheap and easy to prepare. I have gotten my sponges from Daiso (8 rectangle pieces for 2 bucks) and Crayola Washable Paint.

MATERIALS

  • A3-sized drawing paper
  • Sponges
  • Scissor
  • Washable paint
  • Paper plate

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Cut your sponges into various shapes
  2. Squeeze some washable paints onto the paper plates
  3. Give your kids papers to work on
  4. Dip the sponge into the paint and stamp it on the paper

LEARN THROUGH PLAY

sponge painting

Sponge painting is fun and you can take the opportunity to teach your children about shapes and colours. Sonia already knew about colours and shapes so it was ‘kind of’ a recap activity for her. Arnold is only 16-month-young, and you might have guess, shapes and colours are still foreign to him. I would tell him the shape of the sponge as he stamped away happily but if you asked what he had taken away from this activity, I would say FUN. What about knowledge of shapes and colours? I have to be honest, I’m not sure if he actually learned what is a circle, a square, a rectangle or a triangle. I’m not sure if he can differentiate purple from orange. But I believe, as long as I keep inputing knowledge and constantly work on these, he will eventually learn colours and shapes. The key to learning is to keep your kids engaged. And the best way to engage your kids is to learn through play.

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Arnold has short attention span and so I made used of those few minutes to teach him shapes and colours. After that, I let him go wild with the paint.

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Sonia on the other hand was very focus on sponge painting. She would name the colours as she stamp each sponge on her paper.

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With Arnold, I worked on only two shapes – square and circle. I didn’t want to confuse him, and really, he’s still a baby, I’m not in a rush for him to learn geometry.

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Watching him mess himself up and laughing is the greatest prize!

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Did I just mention he has short attention span?

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It didn’t bother him that he has paint all over his face, hands, legs and clothes. He was a happy messy baby!

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While I fooled about with Arnold, Sonia was still very involved in her art work.

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After sponge painting, she did hand painting and was about to do feet painting but I stopped her. Feet painting was a little more dangerous because she might slip and fall. I had to handle two kids, so no, I wasn’t about to take the risk. We will do feet painting when I do not need to divide my attention.

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So there you go… hand painting

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Just look at him. We need to do this more often!!!

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We almost always end up with soiled clothes whenever we paint, so let your child wear dirty-also-never-mind-clothes.

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Arnold just couldn’t get enough!

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I asked for a smile and that was the best she could do. She looked more irritated than happy here but I assure you, she had a great deal of fun!

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And he literally left his footprints and handprints everywhere.

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There was a huge mess to clear but I would still do this again, and again and again. Why? Because the kids love it!

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